Diversity in Heroes

Butterfly WomanSorry for the late post, but I couldn’t sleep last night and ended up sleeping most of the afternoon and evening instead.

Hero stories, whether powered superheroes or just unpowered vigilantes, have always been a great medium for discussing diversity issues. Sometimes, this is very anvilicious, such as with the X-Men as a whole being a metaphor for various civil rights movements since their inception. Other times, it’s less so, such as Captain America or Superman sticking up for everyone, no matter who they are (though sometimes even those can get anvilicious). That’s one of the joys of these stories, they’re always able to promote actual human rights discussions without being blatantly about that topic.
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The Makings of the Magic

golden-watch-gears-31074-1920x1080Yesterday, I finished by stating that I had already covered the arguments against the option for a same-sex couple option for the beginning of Fallout 4 via the lore within the games, the history of the games themselves, and the technology within the games. I then asked if you could guess what I would be covering today. If you guessed the mechanics and marketing for the game, you were right. Everyone else, you fail, but keep reading, because this is, in my opinion, the real reason this is an issue. Continue reading

1950s Style, 2070s Values

Press_Fallout4_Trailer_DeathclawAs some of you may have guessed, I’m off from classes all week so I’m doing Fallout related posts every day. Good times for all. Today, I want to tackle another major argument that people often have in response to the outcry over the forced heterosexual opening. Specifically, I want to address the 1950s aesthetic that is prevalent in the Fallout universe, and more importantly, why that argument doesn’t extend to the values of the people in the 2070s leading up to the apocalypse. Continue reading

Heterosexual Fallout

Angry Gamer Girl Okay folks, today, I’m going to tackle a touchy subject. You’ve probably guessed from the title of this post that I’m going to talk about the whole forced heterosexuality at the start of Fallout 4. Thing is, that’s only going to be part of it. What I’m actually going to address is the fallout (pun intended) that has come about because of discussions over it. See, here’s the thing, it’s reached such epic levels, that even discussing it now has become a reason for someone to be attacked. Continue reading

Looks Are Everything… When It Comes to Girls in Games

Aya Brea, heroine of the Parasite Eve series of games, and today's case study.

Aya Brea, heroine of the Parasite Eve series of games, and today’s case study.

Last week, I started anew my series on diversity in gaming, particularly when it comes to well fleshed out female characters who are ruined in later installments. Today’s prime example is Aya Brea, the protagonist of the Parasite Eve trilogy. She’s also a fine example of something that the industry does horribly, horribly wrong when it comes to female protagonists in gaming. So let’s overdive right into it, shall we?

As always, spoiler alert up front, as this time I will be going into WAY more in-depth issues of end-game aspects of each of the three games. Anyway, the basic premise of these games is that the mitochondria within our cells aren’t just a mutually symbiotic organism that gives us our cellular energy in return for food, but are in fact parasites that use humans to build a world better to their own setting. Something happens to cause the mitochondria of a specific individual to awaken and begin rebelling against humanity, trying to take over the world. In case you’re wondering, this is all BEFORE the games, which are themselves a series of sequels to a Japanese book/movie by the same name. In the story of the book/movie, the girl who possesses the awakened mitochondria is taken over by them and tries to give birth to an ultimate being to destroy all of humanity, but eventually fails because the mitochondria from the father of the ultimate being rebel and destroy it. Got all that? Good, because it’s back story that comes up about halfway through the first game, and I’m trying to make this a bit less convoluted. Continue reading

Taking a Breather

Butterfly WomanJust in the last week, we’ve had two more trans women murdered here in the States. Last Friday night, Bri Golec was stabbed to death by her father, who left her body out on the porch and made a false 911 call saying that they were attacked by members of a cult that his “son” supposedly belonged to. And just a couple days ago, Christina Grant Infiniti in Miami was murdered by her boyfriend. This one has barely been acknowledged, even by media sources that would normally cover these murders, such as the Advocate. Couple this with the fact that on Wednesday, I had a hostile (but thankfully not violent) encounter in the ladies room on campus, and I need a few days for myself. I’ve even skipped my LGBT studies and activism classes for this week because of this, and my professors were told why before either class. As such, I’m not going to really write much today. Instead, I leave you with a couple of essays I wrote about a year or so ago for a human sexuality class, discussing the media influences that existed while I was growing up, and what I would like to see changed. Think of these in light of the recent murders that sometimes, more knowledge of a topic, or more visibility, is not always a good thing. I risk my life every day just by being open and honest. As Laverne Cox said during her speech, there isn’t a moment when I leave my home that I don’t wonder if I’ll be coming home at the end of the day alive.

I’ll be back next week. Stay safe out there. Continue reading

My Tranifesto

Butterfly WomanIt’s been a couple weeks since I last wrote here, in large part because I’ve been too sick/in pain to do much. I’ve also started going back to school, and one of my classes this semester is a history and theory of activism class. This coming week, we’re doing readings over a number of famous and infamous manifestos of other groups. These include The Woman-Identified Woman (an early lesbian-feminist manifesto), the SCUM Manifesto (an extreme pro-female anti-male manifesto), and the Gay Liberation Front Manifesto. One of our ongoing assignments through the class is to have an “activism journal” where we discuss our learning from the class as well as our experiences with activism/volunteering over the course of the semester. So this week, I’m going to do my first post of such, a manifesto of my own (a tranifesto if you will, in honor of the late Matt Kailey). Continue reading